Category Archives: Famous Rings

‘Sunrise Ruby’ becomes the highest-selling ruby ever, hammer price of $30 Million

The 25.59-carat, pigeon-blood-red “Sunrise Ruby” completely blew away all estimates and records yesterday when it sold for an astounding $30.4 million at a Swiss Auction.

A close-up of the gorgeous, record-breaking Ruby ring. Courtesy Sothebys.com

A close-up of the gorgeous, record-breaking Ruby ring. Courtesy Sothebys.com

Sotheby’s described The Sunrise Ruby — Lot 502 of the May 12 sale — as a superb and extremely rare ruby and diamond ring by Cartier. The cushion-shaped ruby is set between two shield-shaped white diamonds weighing 2.47 carats and 2.70 carats, respectively.

A grading report by Gübelin states that the ruby is of Burmese origin and exhibits a well-proportioned cutting style.

Notes the report, “Its vivid but saturated color, poetically referred to as pigeon blood red, is due to a combination of well-balanced trace elements in the stone, typical and characteristic for the finest rubies of Mogok.”

The Ruby ring examined before being put up for auction last night. Image courtesy of Sothebys.com
The Ruby ring examined before being put up for auction last night. Image courtesy of Sothebys.com

The Sunrise Ruby easily eclipsed initial investor’s estimates of a hammer price between $12-18 million, soaring past the necessary $25 million mark to become the most expensive gem that wasn’t a diamond ever sold.

“Something like this ruby is rarer than even once-in-a-lifetime. This is a millennium piece,” said Chief Designer Koorosh Daneshgar, owner of Wedding Bands & Co. “The beauty of the stone, how perfectly it’s cut…it’s something that can only be described as flawless. It is as much a work of art as it is a gorgeous stone.”

“This is exactly the kind of feeling you want when you design a ring as well – something that can’t be found anywhere else, that is flawless. You want your own work of art, like this stone, which will be worth more than $30 million. With the right amount of creativity, skill and care, it will be priceless.”

One of the beautiful ruby pieces designed by Koorosh Daneshgar.
One of the beautiful ruby pieces designed by Koorosh Daneshgar.

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Cody’s Proposal – He’ll Get a Ring Too!

It’s not every day that you get to witness a proposal, but Cody was kind enough to invite us (and, well, the rest of Youtube) into his living room for his Christmas-morning engagement. His engagement is certainly creative enough, but what’s truly unique is his about-to-be-fiancée’s reaction to it! If you haven’t seen it already, check out the video below:

Picture courtesy of YouTube
Picture courtesy of YouTube

Cody starts off by giving her the proposal present, a giant box filled with cardboard letters. She begins to read out each letter in turn, quickly getting through W-I-L-L before piecing the rest together at the start of “Y-O-U.” Her sobs of joy are truly heartfelt, and she can’t even control herself as Cody tries to make his proposal speech! Thankfully, Cody quickly gets to the important question, resulting in a truly loving – if tearful – embrace.

CEO Koorosh Daneshgar
CEO Koorosh Daneshgar

It really hits you in the gut to watch, but it’s undoubtedly cute. And it’s certainly something that they’ll be talking about for the rest of their lives (together!) “That’s exactly the kind of reaction we want someone to have with an engagement,” said Koorosh Daneshgar, CEO and Chief Designer of Wedding Bands & Co. “An engagement is 25% the ring, and 75% the execution behind it!” Koorosh loved the video so much, in fact, that he and the rest of Wedding Bands want to reach out to Cody and offer him a gold men’s wedding band in return for making his fiancée’s Christmas one that she’ll never be able to forget.

Haunted Gems: The Delhi Purple Sapphire

Have you heard of the tale of the haunted Delhi  ? Or perhaps the famous (or infamous) Hope Diamond? If not, you’re in for a treat rather than a trick: for the rest of the week, we’re going to be focusing on haunted gems! Sit back and keep the lights on, because these gems slip past the bizarre and delve straight to the genuinely disturbing.

The Hindu god, Indra

The Hindu god, Indra

Our story begins back in the year 1857, during the period known as the Indian Mutiny. The gem rested as an offering and prize within the temple of Indra, the Hindu god of War and Weather. As it so happened, during the warring of the Indian Mutiny English Colonel W. Ferris looted the gem from the temple. The subsequent years following the theft and the Mutiny, Ferris’ health took a turn for the worse, his finances dwindling alongside it. This same fate befell his son who inherited the sapphire after his father passed away, further sinking the family down into squalor.  But the story isn’t near finished yet! In fact, a friend of the family, who temporarily held onto the stone, spontaneously committed suicide while in possession of the stone.

And yet, there’s more. In 1890, the stone came into the possession of Edward Heron-Allen, an intelligent, respected socialite. Heron-Allen had heard of the stories and rumors that surrounded the purple sapphire and believed them to be merely stories, but quickly changed his tune almost as soon as he came to own the stone. Bad luck ran rampant throughout his life, as well as those of his family and friends. It was, according to him, “stained with the blood, and the dishonor of everyone who has ever owned it.” He even tried to rid himself of the gem by throwing it into a canal, only to have it returned to him a short time later by a friend who was a dealer, he having bought it from someone dredging the canal.

The Purple Sapphire of Dehli
The Purple Sapphire of Dehli

When his daughter was born, he knew he had to rid himself of the stone, lest its curse befall her as well. Locking the sapphire in seven boxes surrounded by good luck charms, Heron-Allen stashed it away in the vault of London’s Natural History Museum for almost 70 years. It was there, in 1974, that a curator found the stone. And, despite the hand-written note warning about the gem, he decided to put the sapphire on display. It wasn’t until 2000 that the stone’s curse struck again: one of the former heads of the museum took the stone to the first conference of the Heron-Allen society, and was caught in a sudden, wicked storm en-route. As if he hadn’t learned his lesson the first time,  he became ill with a stomach bug the second time he tried. The third time gave him a kidney stone!

To this day, the stone resides in the Natural History Museum, waiting for the next poor soul to try to claim what may very well rightfully belong to the gods.